Saturday, August 20, 2016

Celebrating - Jake!

We wanted to celebrate Jake's story with you... As a puppy, Jake was involved in a house fire and surrendered to a vet for care...


Jake made a full recovery but the scars remained...



A local firefighter felt compelled to give Jake a home despite the horrible shape the puppy was in...



Now Jake hangs out at the fire station with his dad!  He travels around with his dad, giving out educational information regarding fire safety and is a mascot of the fire department.  He has even been sworn in as an official member of the department!



Just goes to show you one more time that ANY dog can rise like a Phoenix from the ashes and be a contributing member of the community if just ONE person cares enough to commit to being a furever dad or mom!


Jake also has his own Facebook page now ~~> CLICK

IT JUST TAKES ONE PERSON TO SAVE THE LIFE OF A HOMELESS PET.

Have a ... be that person today!

Go adopt a homeless animal and save their life!







Thursday, June 9, 2016

Not in my neighborhood

TLC has always struggled to find space to save animal lives since we went from a foster-based rescue to what is called a 'brick and mortar' organization... 

Having the ability to save animal lives and be open 7 days a week for the general public to view, interact with and hopefully adopt is what we believe is an essential part of No-Kill and keeping this county at the No-Kill status... 

For those not familiar with the definition of No-Kill, basically it means that no healthy, adoptable animal is killed and to achieve No-Kill status, 90% or more entering your shelter must live... 
At one time in our county when I first got involved out here in California in rescue, for every 10 animals that entered the shelter system, only one came out alive... Five years ago, our county had a kill rate of 60%... For every 10 animals that went into the shelter system, only four came out alive... 

TLC has actively pursued the goal that no healthy, adoptable animal needs to die in our county since its beginning on June 9th of 2009... Yes, today is our 7th year anniversary and in 2,557 days, TLC has managed to save 2,723 animal lives - more than one day... 

On a day we should be celebrating our victories and continuing to achieve our goals, we are being evicted by a landlord that does not want to lease to a dog rescue... Not that we don't pay our almost $5,000 a month rent... But because he does not want to lease to a rescue and it is a 'bad fit'.... 

On Monday, June 6th, we lost in court fighting the eviction and are currently waiting for the sheriff to post the notice on our door that we have 5 days to vacate the four spaces we have gutted, built out, created a rescue center in and have operated a full-time, volunteer-run organization in... 

We find it incredible that there is currently 43 empty commercial properties in Simi Valley and not one of the landlords or owners are willing to lease space to a nonprofit rescue that provides such a valuable service to this community... 



Even more ironic is that our county's shelter currently has more than 600 homeless animals - an all time high in their history - and they continue to struggle to keep the No-Kill status they fought so hard for in the summer of 2012... They have stopped owner surrenders for the past week, while we can offer no relief because we ourselves are being kicked out of our rental space!

The 'not in my neighborhood' or 'in my property' prevails... And it makes you wonder about things... 

Simi Valley's citizens have long protested the huge number of massage parlors in our city - to the point we were referred to as 'Slimy Valley'... At last count there were 34, but these businesses don't seem to have a problem finding property to lease... To the point that in January of last year, our city council adopted a 45-day moratorium on the issuance of licenses for massage parlors... Something Mayor Huber spoke out about over 5 years ago... And something our police department has an additional workload to enter and inspect... We, as a city, struggle with the drug problem here as well... Two areas that attract the criminal element - both areas TLC volunteers have observed from the center and reported to the local police department as any good citizen would... 

But to lease to us?... "Nah, not in my neighborhood"... Makes you wonder how many of these commercial landlords and owners actually live in our city...

In the meantime, TLC has no where to go and 57 dogs and puppies in our rescue... And five days to move.


Monday, May 9, 2016

2 sides (??) to every story???

It is said there are two sides to every story...

So, dear owner, allow me to share my side of this story... Sometime between us closing the rescue center on Saturday evening and 7AM on Mother's Day, you climbed up our steps and left your dog at our doorstep... 


No food, no water, no collar, no note, no information... nothing.

TLC volunteers came in to open and found this poor sweet lady curled up on the artificial grass mat inside the gated area on our front patio... 

How could you do this to your pet?

We have named her "Jane Doe" at this point, and have tried numerous different foods in the hopes of getting her to eat... 

Finally I was able to convince her to eat part of my smoked bacon/cheddar egg sandwich from Starbucks this morning... The first thing she has eaten for us since her arrival... And we tried EVERYTHING at our disposal... We know absolutely nothing about this dog, and how can anyone be so cruel to abandon a dog like this?


We noticed she left blood spots when she urinated, so she (at our expense) is at the vet's office right now... So far, she has badly infected ears, has a skin condition and an ultrasound has been run to see if she has bladder stones causing the bleeding... 

The vets believe she is about 12 years old... 

If you have a side of the story, we'd love to hear it... And yes, we have security surveillance tapes of her being dumped like this... 

If you did not have the funds to provide her with medical care, VCAS does have a program that they can help you out... If you had called us ahead of time, we might have been able to help as well... Instead you chose to throw away this dog like yesterday's newspaper... 

So now, we as a nonprofit rescue are picking up the tab and trying to put this dog's story together like a jigsaw puzzle... We don't know if she's had her shots and is up to date... We do not believe she is spayed... She has no microchip... All of the things any responsible owner would do if they loved their pet... 

Awaiting your call or email to explain your side of the story, "Jane Doe" sits and wonders why she was left at our doorstep like this... 


"Jane Doe" - abandoned our our doorstep in the middle of the night on Mother's Day, 2016

P.S. If anyone wants to help out with her vet bills, we certainly could use the help.  You can donate through PayPal on our website - http://www.tinylovingcanines.org/donate.html




Tuesday, April 26, 2016

H-2-O.... ut oh!

We have bottled drinking water at the house, and have had it for years now after my doctor recommended it, citing research he's read for quite some time about the connection between digestive issues and the amounts of drugs that are dispensed, consumed and then end up in water supplies, but not removed by water companies... I wish I had kept the link he gave me to that web site, but I guess if you are that interested, you'll Google and find it...

The dogs in our house also drink bottled water... More of a convenience frankly, than going to the kitchen sink to refill their large bowl... 


This morning I read a survey done that ended up in my email and it was a bit startling.... 

Now, I don't have any cats, but it sure does make you wonder about what is in our water (and especially because we pay some pretty hefty water rates here in Southern California!)

If you want to read the entire article you can find it here ~~>
http://trupanion.com/blog/2016/04/trupanion-trends-hard-water-pet-urinary-health-study/


More on this topic:

Monday, April 25, 2016

Too nice to die....

I have an aversion to leaving nice dogs to die... If you are a nice dog but you are an older dog, your chances of getting adopted diminish... I have often thought to myself, "What if people treated other people the same way they treat the dogs in shelters?  Older dogs get euthanized, dogs with medical issues die, even fat dogs don't get adopted as quickly and run the chance of being killed... where would that leave me?  I'm old, I have medical issues, I am overweight...."


Well, Nasir is not overweight but he certainly has won the heart of many TLC volunteers, including mine...  We found him at the Camarillo shelter and knew going in that he had a cataract in his right eye... But that didn't stop us from pulling him...

Shortly after saving him, the cataract 'flipped' and instead of flipping inwards, it flipped outwards... 

When we came into the rescue center that morning, it looked like his entire eyeball was going to burst out of its socket... I will spare you the gruesome image and not publish that photo on this blog...

He was also not in really good health... He was underweight and apparently not been giving good nutritional food for some time... His coat was and thin in places... 

But personality-wise?  He was a love... pure sweetness wrapped up in 5 pounds of heart and affection... 


Off to the vets he went... And then we discovered he had a grade 4 heart murmur... Surgery would be dangerous for him... sigh... BIG sigh...

These are the times I HATE what I do... 

Too many times it comes down to the lack of money to save these dogs... 

An 11-year old dog with an adoption donation of $200 and now facing a $1200 surgery to remove this eye... He's really not old in dog years for this breed, but still... And I know, I know... We can't save them all, but it does not make my job any easier... 

I am usually pretty good at making decisions and I have to - every day - based upon what can we do to save and take good care of ALL of the dogs we save at TLC...  Looking at this logically, we just could not afford this new surgery, and even if we could, would he even survive it?

The hard decision had to be made... And I made it... But I tossed and turned that night... Throughout the night... And unhappy about the decision I had made to have him humanely euthanized the next morning... 


When I woke up, I realized I just could not do it... Some how, some way, I would find the money to get this surgery done... He was just TOO sweet and loving of a dog to have to die because of a medical issue that could be fixed... 

Instead of taking him that morning to be humanely euthanized, I took him in to have his surgery done... And then I nervously awaited throughout the day for news from the vet's office... 

Most of the TLC volunteers sat on pins and needles with me... Nasir had quickly become a favorite of everyone's... It was a big sigh of relief when we learned he had pulled through the surgery... 


Once this eye got taken care of, Nasir had a rough first week... But slowly he started gaining weight and his coat started filling out well... 

Because he is potty trained and oh-so-friendly, we let him wander around in the lobby at the rescue center now... He greets people (and begs to be held) when they sit down to do their adoption paperwork on some other dog or puppy... 

We keep hoping someone will see him for the jewel of a dog he is, and he will find his own furever home... He has such an endearing little almost cat-like sound he makes when he is asking to be picked up and cuddled... That little bob of a tail wiggles to beat the band and you cannot help but fall in love with him!

I think (??) he is getting some extra treats and being sneaked some extra goodies, 'cause he is starting to get a bit chunky 'round the middle... (smile)... And losing an eye has not changed one thing about his personality except to make him even more loving, if that is possible... Maybe there is some internal thing going on that he knows despite not having the money to do the surgery, we did it anyway because he truly is worth it, ya know?

Nasir's own person is out there, and will one day walk into the rescue center and fall in love... I just know it... 

Linda


I'm waiting for my furever mom and dad









Monday, April 11, 2016

"You're too fat"

"Owner surrender requesting euthanasia because dog is too fat"

You might think we are kidding, but no, we're not.  We have several of these dogs now at the rescue center.  In fact, we pulled three at one time and set up a special area just for them with extra room to walk around in, feeding them special diets, a program set up with our dog walkers and logs to monitor their weight loss.

We call it our "Chunky Monkey" section and no one can believe these sweet dogs were destined to die - requested to be put to death by their owners - because they were fed too much and/or the wrong things and allowed to get "fat".

What do you even say to someone when they tell you this?


When Sox came to TLC on the 22nd of February, she weighed 29 pounds.   You had to help her stand up by pulling slightly on the lead to give her that extra hand in going from a laying down position to an upright, standing position.  She could not walk up or down the steps of the rescue center... in fact, she was 'done' and out of breath simply walking from the dog room to the front door of the rescue center! 

Then our dog walker would have to carry her down the front stairs, nudge and coax her to walk 200' around on the sidewalk, then carry her up the back steps!

Today, seven weeks later, she weighs 21 pounds.  She is no longer out of breath simply by her walk, can stand up on her own and looks forward to her walks... bring the leash and she is ready to go!


We haven't done anything spectacular here - just simply cared enough about her life to do the right thing.  Sox has been to the vet and there is nothing really medically wrong with her.  Our vet was really impressed by how much weight she's lost in 7 weeks (8 pounds) and by this time next month in May, she'll be at her ideal weight.

Now Sox can sit down like a normal dog, and walks without the pain of her hind legs being stretched too far apart because of the extra girth in her belly.  This dog's frame was never meant to carry almost 30 pounds - her ideal weight is 15.

As for her special diet, we purchase frozen green beans and freshly shredded carrots in addition to the high quality kibble (Zignature) that we feed all of our rescued dogs.  A bit of warmed up salt-free chicken broth popped into the microwave added to the mix?  The chunky monkeys love their extra special meals at TLC!

Sox could use an advocate however... Or more than one... Someone willing to come to the rescue center and walk her once a day, or several times a week. Have you been wanting to give back and not been able to figure out how?  This could be your gentle act of paying it forward -- to help save the life of a sweet, deserving dog that did not deserve to die because she was 'too fat'!



Thursday, March 10, 2016

Adoption FAQS

We respond to so many inquires with the same answers, so we thought we'd save you time and our volunteers' time by listing them somewhere.  So here goes:


  1. If the dog or puppy is showing on our website (www.tinylovingcanines.org), they are still available.  Other websites like Petfinder and Adopt-A-Pet do not reload our information as quickly as we do, so we cannot assure you of the same timely information out there on the Internet beyond our website.
  2. If you see our rescue on Petfinder and click their "inquiry" button, you send an email to us and we respond asking you to submit an adoption application (available online https://tinylovingcanines.wufoo.com/forms/z7x3k7/) or to come into the rescue center at 1736 Erringer Road, 2nd Floor, Simi Valley, CA and do it in person.
  3. We are owned, run and operated by volunteers - many who also have full-time jobs as well.  We do our best to answer all emails within 24 hours, and approve any adoption applications within 48 (or advise you otherwise and why).
  4. Once you have been sent in the adoption application and received a return email indicating you have been approved, the approval is valid only for 24 hours.  After that time, we will assume you are no longer interested in the dog or puppy and will discard your information.
  5. Rescue work is very fluid and organic - we can receive and approve numerous adoption applications on the same dog or puppy (and do). Because you have received an approved adoption application email, that does not guarantee you will be adopting them (i.e. the puppy is ONLY approved to be adopted by you) - we do not hold dogs and puppies based upon approved adoption applications.  There are just too many dogs and puppies getting ready to die in shelters and we have only so much space to save their lives.
  6. If you have submitted an adoption application, have been approved and contacted via email of the same, we cannot hold the specific dog or puppy for you unless you are willing to put down a 50% nonrefundable adoption deposit (for exact amounts, please see #9 below).  This can ONLY be done online via PayPal (link is on our website under http://www.tinylovingcanines.org/donate.html) or in person - we no longer accept credit card numbers over the phone as we will not have your signature on the required credit card receipt for our files.
  7. We are not a boarding facility, nor do we have a boarding permit by county ordinances to do this for you.  Once you start the process, please be prepared to see it through to the end and pick up your dog or puppy.
  8. We STRONGLY recommend that you think long, hard and well before considering adopting a dog or puppy.  Puppies especially are expensive the first year of their life.  Most of our rescues have a life-span of 15 to 20 years, so if you are not prepared to take care of them and have them live out their natural life, step back and rethink this idea before adopting.
  9. Our adoption donations are fixed and tax deductible.  This allows us to fund the huge amount of vet costs we incur each year and continue to save the next dog or litter of puppies waiting to die tomorrow (in 2015, our vet bills ran over $100,000 BTW).  Dogs over 5 years or with us for more than 6 months are $200.  Dogs and puppies between 6 months and 5 years are $350.  Puppies under 6 months are $500.
  10. Each dog or puppy will be spayed/neutered and microchipped prior to adoption.  Their shots and vaccines will be up to date (*) at time of adoption.  Each adoption packet includes a complimentary visit with our vet and a 10% off coupon at Theresa's Country Feed within 5 days of adoption. Each adoption packet includes a complimentary free groom at Indiana Bones Temple of Groom - these services require a copy of our adoption agreement to receive.
  11. We do not 'guarantee' the health of any dog or puppy we have saved from the shelters.  We receive very little information beyond they were picked up as a stray or are owner surrendered.  As such, we have little background information to pass onto you - we can only advise you of what we have observed, if we've taken them to the vet and what they were treated for.   Again, once you have adopted, you take on all medical responsibility for any immediate issues or long ranging health issues, so think carefully before adopting under financial constraints and issues.

(*) If over 3 months, dogs and puppies will be vaccinated against rabies.  Adult dogs will have both bordetella (kennel cough) and vaccinated against the core diseases.  If the puppy litter was born with us, they will have three series of puppy vaccines (4 weeks, 6 weeks and 8 weeks).  If not, our vaccination protocols start when they arrive, and you will be advised they do not have the recommended 3 series of puppy vaccines on your adoption contract at time of adoption.  Some vets recommend 4 series - all vets have different opinions as to when and how many - we follow the protocols for shelter medicine established by U.C. Davis.